George Soros Role in World Democracy

Few rich people can do what George Soros has done with his life. At the age of 86, George Soros still finds time to change the world in one way or the other. Despite the age, he is also involved with his businesses. George Soros makes most of his money from the Soros Fund Management that was established in the year 1978 with the help of other investors. Up to date, the Soros Fund Management is the biggest hedge fund in the United States. While many titles can be used to describe George Soros, the one that fit him most is a philanthropist, business magnate, investor and author. Learn more on Discover the Networks about George Soros.

When it comes to writing, he expresses his opinions through books and articles that are published in several outlets across the world. While studying at the London School of Economics in the early 1950s, George Soros became influenced by Karl Popper and particularly his books on the theory of reflexivity. With a full understanding of these theories, George Soros managed to relate them to the capital market. This helped him develop theories about market value securities as well as asset bubbles. George Soros manages his giving through the Open Society Foundations where he pays attention to issues affecting the minority. He is a speaker of the oppression of the minority by the mainstream society. This means that he addresses issues such as same sex marriage, discrimination of drug users and the discrimination of sex workers. His love for humanity may have been fueled by his upbringing. George Soros grew up in a Nazi occupied Hungary in the 1940s.

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He managed to maneuver until he found an opportunity to move to the United Kingdom. George Soros began as a tout before switching to a being a waiter. These are some of the jobs that motivated him to work hard and join the London School of Economics. In the United States, George Soros is also active in politics where he is recognized as a supporter of the Democratic Party. For instance, he donated millions of money during the past elections to help election of a long term friend Hillary Clinton. He has supported the restoration of democracies in other nations across the globe such as South Africa, Ukraine, Georgia and Panama. Currently, he is involved in a project in Burma. Learn more about his profile at businessinsider.com

Some of the books that he has written include the Age of Fallibility, the Soros Lectures at the Central European University as well as the Crisis of Global Capitalism. He has been featured on the hedge fund wall of fame alongside famous business people such as Leon Levy, Bruce Kovner, Tudor Jones as well as David Swensen, Kenneth Griffin and Jack Nash. He has a wealth of close to $30 billion.

Bruce Levenson’s Generosity

Bruce Levenson is a named most commonly associated with the Atlanta Hawks basketball team. Although he’s no longer an owner of Atlanta Spirit, LLC, his name has remained in ESPN news. He’s still co-founder and Partner at United Communications Group. But lately, Mr. Bruce Levenson has been focused more on philanthropic endeavors than business.

Recently, his philanthropic eye has been set on higher education. His work with the Do Good Institute is taking the world of higher education by storm. The initiative aims at undergraduate students at the University of Maryland. The objective is to expose and inspire students to become more involved in the world of non-profit and volunteering.

It’s the modern world’s attempt to create the next generation of non-profit business leaders. The world seems to be leaning in one particular direction lately, and the Do Good Institute is trying to balance everything out. This new wave of non-profit business leaders is to challenge their private-sector counterparts.

Levenson (brucelevenson.com) and the Do Good Institute aren’t saying that there aren’t already extraordinary people trying to make the world a better place. Over the years, they’ve noticed dozens of amazing organizations fall short of their mission because the leaders of those organizations don’t have the necessary business skills to succeed.

Upon realizing that most of these failures were due to the simple lack of business skills, Levenson and his wife, Karen, came up with the idea. They took their idea to the University of Maryland and put up the $75 million to start the initiative. The state of Maryland added an additional $20 million.

The initiative gave birth to the University of Maryland’s first Philanthropy 101 class. Students were given $10,000 to allocate to a cause of their choosing.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/undergrads-and-graduate-students-mastering-philanthropy-300038081.html